FAQs
FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Adoptions
Intake/Admissions
Euthanasia/Aftercare
Feral Cats
Volunteering
Medical
Lost & Found
Affiliations
Injured Animals
Miscellaneous

Adoptions

How long do animals remain up for adoption?

Although most of our animals are adopted within one or two weeks, there is no limit to the length of time that animals remain available for adoption. In some cases, we may care for an animal for several days, weeks or months. We closely monitor dogs, cats and little critters who remain at our shelter for an extended time and give them enrichment activities to minimize their stress.

May I adopt a pet as a gift for someone else?

Yes! Our furry friends make the perfect gift for the holidays, Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day or any special occasion. Our adoption matchmakers will help you pick out the perfect pet for a friend or family member ready to give an animal a loving, forever home.

I’m looking for a certain breed. Can you tell me if you have one available for adoption?

Although we may have the breed you desire, we are unable to provide this information by telephone or hold an animal for you. Search our adoptable dogs or adoptable cats.

What does a dog/cat adoption include?

All of the cats and dogs on our adoption floor have been spayed/neutered, are up to date on all current vaccinations and come with a collar and leash for dogs, a collar and pet carrier for cats, a bag of Hills Science Diet food, a free follow-up veterinary exam with VCA Animal Hospitals and 10 percent off at AHS retail locations.See How It Works for more information.

Intake/Admissions

Is AHS a “no-kill” shelter? 

As the state’s largest, nonprofit full-service animal-welfare and protection agency, we accept animals regardless of age, breed or medical condition. That means we must face the difficult task of evaluating them for medical and temperament problems. Despite our extensive veterinary resources, many animals arrive at our shelter too sick, too severely injured or too horribly abused to be medically rehabilitated. Rather than cause these poor animals even more unnecessary suffering, we humanely euthanize animals with severe behavioral problems and/or temperament problems that create a safety risk to people or other animals.

How many animals do you take in each year? Each day?

The Arizona Humane Society currently take in approximately 38,000 animals per year. The number of animals we take in daily varies from season to season. During the spring and summer months (the canine and feline breeding seasons), we can receive as many as 100-200 animals per day. During winter months, we average 25-50 animals per day.

I have a litter of puppies/kittens. Can I surrender them to you for adoption?

Puppies and kittens must be at least 8 weeks old and weigh two pounds before they can be spayed/neutered and put up for adoption. We ask that you keep the puppies/kittens until they are old enough and weigh enough to be put up for adoption.

I can no longer care for my pet. Can I bring him/her to AHS for adoption by another family?

If you find yourself in this position, we always recommend that you surrender your pet to a shelter only as your last option. Instead, tell your friends, family members, neighbors and coworkers that you need to find a new home for your pet. You’re likely to have positive results through this type of networking.

If you must surrender your pet to the shelter, you’ll need to visit the Admissions Department at our Sunnyslope Campus. We do request a donation per animal or litter you are surrendering. This donation helps us cover the many costs associated with providing quality care for every animal turned in to us. Please note that we are unable to accept animal turn-ins at our Nina Mason Pulliam Campus for Compassion. See Surrender an Animal for more information.

Additional Admissions FAQs (English)

Additional Admissions FAQs (Spanish)

Euthanasia/Aftercare

Do you offer euthanasia services?

Yes. We know how difficult it is to face the tough decision of euthanizing a pet. To learn more about our humane euthanasia services, please go to Euthanasia & Aftercare.

My pet has died. Can you help me with disposal?

We are truly sorry for your loss. You can bring your deceased pet to the Admissions Department at our Sunnyslope Campus. We charge a $30 fee to cover the costs associated with disposal. If you would like to know more about our Columbarium, where your pet can have a peaceful final resting place, go to Euthanasia & Aftercare.

My pet needs to be euthanized. Can you come pick it up?

We know how difficult it is to make this decision for your pet. We can send one of our EAMTs™ to pick up your pet to be humanely euthanized for a fee of $100. Please note that there may be a significant waiting period before your pet is picked up. If your pet is suffering or in pain, please take him to the nearest veterinary clinic.

Feral Cats

Can you remove the trapped/feral cats in my neighborhood?

No. We do not trap stray cats, but we will accept them in the Admissions Department at our Sunnyslope Campus. We charge a fee to anyone who brings us feral and/or trapped cats for surrender. The fee is in response to the tremendous strain that the increase in feline intakes puts on our shelter resources.  See Stray Animal Resources for information about feral cats and trap-neuter-release (TNR) programs.

Volunteering

Can I volunteer with AHS?

Yes! We’re always seeking volunteers to help in a variety of areas including admissions, adoptions, our Pet Emporium Shop and Thrift Stores. And we can always use volunteers to help us with clerical services, special events, and to provide foster-care homes for recovering sick and injured animals.  Please see the Volunteer section for more information on how you can help at the Arizona Humane Society.

Medical

Does AHS have veterinarians on staff? 

Yes. We employ 12 full-time veterinarians, who are assisted by a skilled team of full-time veterinary technicians. Our veterinary staff’s time and talents are directed entirely to caring for animals in our public spay, neuter and wellness clinics and sick and injured patients in the Second Chance Animal Hospital™. All of our veterinarians are board-certified.  See Meet Our Team for more information on our veterinarian staff.

I can’t afford to treat my pet medically – can Arizona Humane Society help?

Our expanded veterinary clinic offers reduced-cost services to accommodate those people who may not be able to afford comprehensive veterinary care for their companion animals. Our intent is not to replace full-service clinics, but to provide people, who are facing the difficult decision of having to surrender their pets due to medical conditions, the option of affordable vet care. For more information, go to Veterinarian Services.

How does the 9-1-1 Emergency Gap Fund work?

Courtesy of a few of AHS’ longtime donors, staff members and its board of directors, the fund will provide people with the short-term financial assistance they need for their pet’s care until they are able to pay for the services themselves. It is not a free-service program.  Rather, when the 9-1-1 Emergency Gap Recipients are able to pay back the funds that were authorized to cover their pet’s care, the fund will perpetually replenish itself through the repayment of those utilizing the fund, which will, in effect, help care for hundreds of owned animals.

Does AHS offer spay and neuter services?

AHS provides high quality low-cost spay and neuter and wellness services through our two clinics and mobile clinic because we believe these services should be affordable and accessible for all pet owners. See Spay or Neuter Your Pet for hours, locations and costs.

Lost & Found

My pet is missing… what should I do?

We understand the feeling that comes with discovering your pet is lost. Please review our suggestions for ways to help you find your missing pet.

I found a lost dog or cat in my neighborhood. How can I find his or her family?

Looking here is a good start. If you’ve found a pet, chances are, someone’s worried sick and desperate to find him. For advice on how you can help reunite a lost pet and his family, go to Lost or Found a Pet.

What is the fee to reclaim my lost pet from AHS?

All animals that are returned to owners will be assessed a $40 ($85 for unaltered pets) fee, plus boarding or hospitalization fees. If an animal is healthy or requires minimal medical treatment while in our care, the animal will be assessed a boarding fee of $20 per day. If the animal is critically sick or injured and requires intensive care and medical treatment, then the animal will be assessed a fee of $40 per day for intensive care. If the animal has been provided any medical care (such as splinting of limbs, IV fluids, radiographs, etc.),the owner will be billed the Vet Service Charge prices for those services, in addition to the $40 return-to-owner fee and boarding fees.

In summary, when an owner claims his stray pet, charges should include:

$40 return-to-owner fee ($85 for unaltered pets)
$20 per day boarding fee for healthy or slightly injured animals
 • $40 per day boarding fee for animals needing intensive care, plus Veterinarian Service Charge fees for medical treatments, including:
- $20 exam fee
- Medications and treatments
- $18 per vaccine
 • $20 ambulance-service fee, if dog came in through field
$10 fee for after-hours pick up (5:30 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.)

Affiliations

Is Arizona Humane Society a part of the Maricopa County Animal Care and Control Services (MCACC)?

No. We are a private, non-profit animal welfare organization funded by donations and service fees. Maricopa County Animal Care and Control Services is the government agency responsible for animal control. Although we work together on many issues and share many of the same goals, we are separate agencies.

Are you a “chapter” of The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) or American Humane

Association (AHA)? 

No. We are a private, non-profit organization. There is a misconception that all “humane societies” operate under the umbrella of the HSUS or AHA and/or receive funding from them. This is not true. Although we (and other humane societies) partner with these national organizations on special projects or legislative issues from time-to-time, we are all independent organizations without affiliations to the national organizations.

Injured Animals

If I see an injured or sick stray animal, should I call AHS?

Yes! To request an ambulance for a sick or injured stray animal or animal in distress, call our Field Operations department at 602.997.7585 Ext. 2073 (0 after hours). 

We will dispatch one of our specially-trained Emergency Animal Medical Technicians™ (EAMTs™) to the scene as quickly as we can. If possible, we ask that you stay with the animal until our EAMT™ arrives on scene.  We respond to all animal emergencies involving sick and injured stray animals. For animal cruelty, we cover the cities of Phoenix and Scottsdale ONLY.  If you need a phone number listing to report an animal cruelty case in another city, or for more information, go to Report Animal Abuse Now.

Miscellaneous

Where can I get my pet licensed?

Cat licenses are optional. But by law, all dogs older than 3 months of age must be licensed by Maricopa County Animal Care and Control. For more information, you can call them at 602.506-7387.

My neighbor’s dog barks all the time. Who can help with this problem?

They may be in violation of the noise nuisance ordinance and your local police department or sheriff’s department handles barking-dog complaints. In Phoenix, call (602) 262-6466. In unincorporated areas of Maricopa County, call 602.506.4400. For all other areas, contact your local police department.